Song of the day: Columbus Short – "My Babe"

I’m a semi-fan of the blues – i.e., I have to be in the mood for it, otherwise I find it a bit dull.

But when I am in the mood I love it, even when it’s a remake of an old blues song recorded for a movie:

Columbus Short – “My Babe (2008)

Link

Here’s the original:

Little Walter – “My Babe (1955)

Link

Thanks to Stephen for letting me know about “My Babe”. Thanks, Stephenita!

By the way, the drumming in Columbus Short’s version of “My Babe” reminds me of a Squeeze song:

Squeeze – “Messed Around (1981)

Link

Update:

Commenter Duncan (Hi, Duncan!) mentioned that “My Babe” was based upon an old spiritual called “This Train” that was recorded by Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

Thanks to Duncan’s comment I’ll present you with “This Train”. Sister Rosetta Tharpe recorded it four times in her career: in 1939, 1943, and twice in 1947.

And…

Being the completist I am, here’s the first recorded version of “This Train”:

Wood’s Famous Blind Jubilee Singers – “This Train Is Bound For Glory” (1925)

Link

3 Responses to Song of the day: Columbus Short – "My Babe"

  1. Duncanmusic says:

    You could also look at Sister Rosetta Tharpe doing 'This Train' as Little Walter's antecedent for 'My Babe' …secular version of Spiritual.

  2. Peter says:

    “You could also look at Sister Rosetta Tharpe doing 'This Train'…”

    Can do, Duncanmusic.

    “…as Little Walter's antecedent for 'My Babe' …secular version of Spiritual.”

    I'm looking forward to hearing that.

    Update: I've found it, and I'll put it on the blog tomorrow.

  3. Peter says:

    Hey, Duncan: Putting Sister Rosetta Tharpe's song “This Train” has proven to be a little tricky.

    It's tricky because Sister Rosetta recorded four versions of the song (once in 1939, and again in 1943, and twice in 1947). As a result, I find myself in a bit of a dilemma. Do I present you with all four, thereby putting the post in danger of it becoming more about Sister Rosetta Tharpe than Columbus Short / Little Walter, or just put one version in the post?

    Compounding this situation is the fact that I've also found the earliest recorded example of “This Train” (1925) and feel the need to put that in the post too.

    By gum, these are thorny questions.

    A-ha! I think I've solved the thorniness. Stay tuned…

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