Musical coincidences # 356

January 8, 2013

As I was listening to Rumer’s version* of Stephen Bishop‘s “It Might Be You“, the lovely little tune sung by the backing vocalists at the end of the song got stuck in my head. As I kept humming it to myself over and over again, it became one of the tunes in Marshall Crenshaw‘s “Whenever You’re On Mind”…

Stephen Bishop – “It Might Be You (1983) (excerpt)

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Marshall Crenshaw – “Whenever You’re On My Mind (1983) (excerpt)

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Here are the full versions:

Stephen Bishop – “It Might Be You (1983)

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Marshall Crenshaw – “Whenever You’re On My Mind (1983)

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(*Thanks for letting me know about Rumer, Rushbo!)

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Song of the day: Marshall Crenshaw – "One Day With You"

July 9, 2012

Instead of blathering on about why Marshall Crenshaw‘s second album, Field Day (1983), would go on my list of top-ten power pop albums (if I ever got around to making one), I thought I’d just play you one reason why:

Marshall Crenshaw – “One Day With You” (1983)

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Official website
Marshall Crenshaw on MySpace


Song of the day: Danny Gatton – "In My Room"

July 1, 2012

When you’re a guitarist with unassailable ability and a good bunch of musicians behind you, and you want to record The Beach Boys‘ “In My Room” but you don’t have a vocalist, you realise you don’t need a vocalist because you can do this:

Danny Gatton – “In My Room (1991)

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This isn’t a musical coincidence or anything, but Danny’s version of “In My Room” reminds me of Marshall Crenshaw‘s version of “What Time Is It?”:

Marshall Crenshaw – “What Time Is It?” (1983)

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But back to Danny Gatton. Here’s his rip-roarin’ version of the theme to The Simpsons:

Danny Gatton – “The Simpsons (1991)

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Trivia Time: Danny didn’t want to record The Simpsons theme. His record company persuaded him to because they wanted something they could get played on the radio. Danny offered his thoughts at the end of the track. (It’s quiet, but there’s a definite audible comment.)

And so concludes this week of instrumentals. I hope it wasn’t too much of an ordeal for you. We’ll resume vocal duties tomorrow.

(Now all I need to do is think of a song that has singing in it.)

Oh, and before I forget, here are the original versions of today’s songs:

The Beach Boys – “In My Room (1963)

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The Jive Five with Eugene Pitt – “What Time Is It?” (1962)

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Danny Elfman – “The Simpsons Theme (1989)


Marshall Crenshaw – "For Her Love"

January 28, 2012

I know that some readers of this blog are not particularly keen on the music of Marshall Crenshaw, but I’m in the mood for one of my favourite songwriters of the 80’s (i.e., Marshall Crenshaw).

At the risk of displeasing a few people…

Marshall Crenshaw – “For Her Love” (1983)

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Sorry about that, non-Marshall fans. But when you’re in the mood, you’re in the mood.

“For Her Love” appeared on Marshall’s second album, Field Day. Because the album’s bombastic production (by Steve Lillywhite) was not universally loved, someone decided a remix of some of its songs was in order.

As a bonus (for people who like Mr. Crenshaw’s music), here’s the remix of “For Her Love” (not by Steve Lillywhite):

Marshall Crenshaw – “For Her Love” (remix) (1984)

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Song of the day: Marshall Crenshaw – "Monday Morning Rock"

May 10, 2010

It’s Monday, so…

Marshall Crenshaw – “Monday Morning Rock” (1983)

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“Monday Morning Rock” appears on MC’s sophomore second LP, Field Day (1983), an album I have a lot of trouble staying away from.

Official website
Marshall Crenshaw on MySpace


Marshall Crenshaw quote of the day

April 10, 2010

I just came across this fabulous quote from MC just after his debut album was released (see previous post). He talks about his second album, and his comment is priceless:

“On the exhilarating evidence of his first album, Marshall Crenshaw gives every promise of being a rock and roll song master on the level of such illustrious forerunners as Goffin and King, Mann and Weil, and Barry and Greenwich. If he’s consistent, that is. But he’s not worried about the crucial second album yet. “Our next record can be The Best of Marshall Crenshaw – the same songs in a different sequence. And after that,” he says, “we’ll put out our live album.””

(From an article on MC by Kurt Loder for Rolling Stone, May 13, 1982, via The Beat Patrol. Thanks, Beat Patrol!)


Song of the day: Marshall Crenshaw – "There She Goes Again"

April 10, 2010

Speaking of all-time favourite power pop albums*…

Marshall Crenshaw – “There She Goes Again” (1982)

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Or…

Marshall Crenshaw – “Mary Anne” (1982)

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Or…

Marshall Crenshaw – “I’ll Do Anything” (1982)

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Or…

Marshall Crenshaw – “Rockin’ Around In N.Y.C.” (1982)

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I mean, really. Should a musician not named John or Paul be able to write tunes that good?

Official website
Marshall Crenshaw on MySpace

(*Well, I was the other day…)