Musical coincidences # 334

November 15, 2012

My friend Steve (Hi, Steve!) asked me if I’d ever had a post that featured songs using the riff from T. Rex‘s “Get It On“. My immediate answer was “Nope”, so Steve supplied some tracks he knew of that borrowed the riff, and I found some others.

First of all, here’s the T. Rex riff:

T. Rex – “Get It On (1971) (excerpt)

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Apparently, that riff stemmed from a much earlier song. Wikipedia says:

[T. Rex’s Marc] Bolan claimed to have written the song out of his desire to record Chuck Berry‘s “Little Queenie”, and said that the riff is taken from the Berry song.”

My guess is that this is the part of “Little Queenie” that Marc Bolan appropriated:

Chuck Berry – “Little Queenie” (1959) (excerpt)

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Here’s a cavalcade of copycats:

The Rolling Stones – “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It) (1974) (excerpt)

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AC/DC – “High Voltage (1975) (excerpt)

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The Cars – “Dangerous Type” (1979) (excerpt)

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Andy Taylor – “Take It Easy” (1986) (excerpt)

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The most litigious musician on the Internet – “Cream (1991) (excerpt)

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Oasis – “Cigarettes & Alcohol (1994) (excerpt)

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Here are the full versions:

Chuck Berry – “Little Queenie” (1959)

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T. Rex – “Get It On (1971)

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The Rolling Stones – “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It) (1974)

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AC/DC – “High Voltage (1975)

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The Cars – “Dangerous Type” (1979)

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Andy Taylor – “Take It Easy” (1986)

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The most litigious musician on the Internet – “Cream (1991)

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Oasis – “Cigarettes & Alcohol (1994)

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Musical coincidences # 288

August 22, 2012

It’s amazing where you can end up on the Internet when all you want to do is watch a YouTube video. After what I thought was going to be quick and easy looking for a particular video on YouTube, I looked at it, then something else, and then something else again, and then something else after that as well. All of those other videos had nothing to do with what I originally wanted to look at. (Do people ever say the Internet can waste your time?)

Anyway, for some unknown reason (well, it’s unknown to me) I ended up watching a heap of videos. The last one I watched before it prompted me to write this post was of a Macedonian pop song. As I was listening, I noticed a tune in it that sounded very reminiscent of something extreme popular in the Anglo pop world.

Here we go:

Toše Proeski – “Krajnje Vreme” (2004) (excerpt)

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Oasis – “Wonderwall (1995) (excerpt)

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Here are the full versions:

Toše Proeski – “Krajnje Vreme” (2004)

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Oasis – “Wonderwall (1995)

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Musical coincidences # 74

February 7, 2011

A couple of days ago I presented you with a coincidence involving English band Oasis (also known as “We’re $#%^&@* better than everyone! Nya, nya, nya-$#%^&@* nya, nya!”).

Here we go again…

Oasis – “Shakermaker (1994) (excerpt)

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The New Seekers – “I’d Like To Teach The World To Sing (In Perfect Harmony) (1971) (excerpt)

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And here are the full versions:

Oasis – “Shakermaker (1994)

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The New Seekers – “I’d Like To Teach The World To Sing (In Perfect Harmony) (1971)

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Musical coincidences # 73

February 5, 2011

Loyal reader David of Williamstown (Hi, David!) alerted me to this coincidence. I wasn’t aware of it because it involves Oasis, a band I’m not especially fond of and haven’t heard much except for what was played on the radio in the 1990s, back when they were bigger than themselves.

Here’s the opening tune in Oasis’ “Whatever” (1994):

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According to Neil Innes, that was a little too close identical to the opening tune in his song “How Sweet To Be An Idiot” (1973):

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I’d agree with that.

Anyway, Neil pestered Oasis in a legal way (I suppose that’s the kind of thing you do if you have a lawyer), and Oasis gave money and a co-writing credit to satisfy Neil’s I’ve-been-wronged!-ness.

According to coincidence-pointer-out-erer David, this coincidence is fairly well-known. It’s mentioned in “Whatever”‘s Wikipedia entry, and somebody even posted it on YouTube:

Here are the full versions:

Note: Before you get to the full versions of both songs, I want to point out that Oasis’ “Whatever” comes in two lengths: the original 6:20 “album version”; and the mercifully trimmed 3:55 “radio edit”. I certainly won’t stop you if you want to play that 6-and-a-half-minute behemoth instead of the much more manageable radio edit. But the choice is yours…

Oasis – “Whatever (1994) (radio edit)

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Oasis – “Whatever (1994) (the full catastrophe)

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Neil Innes – “How Sweet To Be An Idiot” (1973)

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Seeing as we’re in Oasis-bashing mode, I’ll post another coincidence involving them in a couple of days.