Song of the day: Slade – "Get Down And Get With It"

April 8, 2013

I was trying to think of something witty and/or profound to start off this Slade post to say how great I thought they were – but then I realised I didn’t need to say anything. All you need to do is play the video.

For me, the highlight of this mini-concert is “Get Down And Get With It” (starting at 17:09). It’s where Slade becomes an unstoppable force of nature.

Slade live at Granada TV (1971)
1. Hear Me Calling
2. Look Wot You Dun
3. Darling Be Home Soon
4. Coz I Luv You
5. Get Down And Get With It
6. Born To Be Wild

Incidentally, as I was gathering the links for the tracks I discovered something I never knew. I discovered the name of the person who wrote “Born To Be Wild”.

“Born To Be Wild” was written by someone called Mars Bonfire.

I’ll just repeat that name: Mars Bonfire.

That is now officially my favourite rock star name. Ever.

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Song of the day: Slade – "Move Over" (live at the BBC)

May 21, 2012

A while ago I posted Slade‘s version of obscure Sixties track “Shape Of Things To Come“. I posted it in response to an earlier post of that obscure Sixties song performed by someone else, and (sorry – I’ll try not to make this paragraph as complicated as it’s starting to sound) a commenter by the name of Murph (Hi, Murph!) mentioned the Slade version. I didn’t know this (along with plenty of other things I don’t know), and I found out that along with a studio version appearing on their second album, Play It Loud, it appears on Slade’s Live At The BBC, a double album where the first disc contains recordings the band made for the BBC and the second disc is a concert recorded in 1972.

Anyway, I made Slade’s Live At The BBC version of “Shape Of Things To Come” a Song of the day. (Oops. I mentioned that at the start of the previous paragraph. This post is becoming circular.)

But getting back to today’s song…

As I listened to Live At The BBC (which I hadn’t before) my predominant thought was: “No wonder people say Slade were a great live band.” And then I remembered Robert Christgau’s comment: “I judge a good rock and roll ‘encyclopedia’ by whether or not Slade is included.”

For me, one of the standout tracks on the album was their version of Janis Joplin‘s “Move Over”. It stood out because its main tune was so catchy. As soon as that melody went into my head it stayed there for the rest of the day. And that’s why I’m playing it to you today – it’s hooky as heck. (Or, to use an even ruder term: it’s heckin’ hooky.)

There are two versions of “Move Over” on Slade’s Live At The BBC. I didn’t know which one to choose for today’s song because I think they’re both magnificent, so I’ve gone for both.

Slade – “Move Over” (live at the BBC) (1972)

Link

Slade – “Move Over Baby” (live at The Paris Theare, London, August 17, 1972)

Link

Here’s the studio version:

Slade – “Move Over” (1972)

Link

And the original:

Janis Joplin – “Move Over” (1971)

Link

Boy that’s a catchy tune.

Coda:

It’s just occurred to me that this is an Australian power pop blog. I really should try to find some Australian power pop to play on it.


Song of the day: Slade – "The Shape Of Things To Come" (live at the BBC)

April 14, 2012

A few days ago I played you a song called “Shape Of Things To Come“, a groovy pseudo-psychedelic rocker from 1964.

The song prompted a comment from a chap called Murph (who I want to really want to call Murphisto but I won’t – Hi, Murph!). He said that his favourite version of it is by Slade. I’m glad Murph said that, because just mentioning Slade is all the encouragement I need to play you some Slade. And say the name Slade repeatedly.

There are two versions of the song from Slade: one that was released on their second album, Play It Loud, and one that was recorded for the BBC in 1970. I’ll play you both, but the BBC version is the one to go for. It’s a ripper:

Slade – “The Shape Of Things To Come (live at the BBC) (1970)

Link

Slade – “The Shape Of Things To Come (tame studio version) (1970)

Link

Thanks for mentioning Slade, Murph!