Song of the day: Split Enz – "Maybe"

March 28, 2013

I’m in a Split Enz mood today.

Split Enz – “Maybe (1975)

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Song of the day: Split Enz – "Shark Attack"

November 18, 2012

I recently read a comment in a post from (hopefully frequent) blog visitor Jon (Hi, Jon!) asking for a specific song.

I would like to let Jon – and anyone else – know that I’m blissed out whenever someone requests a song here.

It blisses me out for two reasons:

1. Someone visited the blog; and
2. When someone requests a song I discover something they like.

So, in my current blissed-out state I’m pleased as punch to let you know that Jon requested “Shark Attack” by Split Enz. I’m even more pleased because I’m a huge fan of Split Enz. I think this is what’s called a win-win situation…

Split Enz – “Shark Attack” (1980)

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One more reason I’m extremely pleased Jon suggested “Shark Attack” is because it contains one of my all-time favourite lines. I know that’s a big call considering the entire history of recorded music, but get this:

“There was slaughter in the water when I fought her”

Genius.


Musical coincidences # 336

November 17, 2012

I was reading Wikipedia’s entry on Split Enz and got to the section on Dizrythmia, where it said this about one of its tracks:

[“My Mistake“‘s] introduction bears a close resemblance to Jack Clement‘s novelty single “My Voice Keeps Changing On Me” [sic], a song that Noel Crombie later covered in 1983.

Well, that was something I didn’t know.

Let’s see…

Split Enz – “My Mistake (1977) (excerpt)

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Jack Clement – “My Voice Is Changing” (1963) (excerpt)

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Yep.

Here are the full versions, along with Noel Crombie’s effort:

Split Enz – “My Mistake (1977)

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(Live)

Jack Clement – “My Voice Is Changing” (1963)

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Noel Crombie – “My Voice Keeps Changing On Me” (1983)

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(Live)


Musical coincidences # 302

September 18, 2012

One more coincidence with Jeff Lynne and the Electric Light Orchestra?

OK then. In this case, though, it’s a bit difficult for me to say with any certainty that Jeff engaged in any music pilfering here. Both tracks were recorded in 1983, so it’s entirely possible that this is just a coincidence, and nothing more. (But I wouldn’t put it past the Lynnemeister…)

Electric Light Orchestra – “Stranger (1983) (excerpt)

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Split Enz – “Message To My Girl (1983) (excerpt)

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Here are the full versions:

Electric Light Orchestra – “Stranger (1983)

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Split Enz – “Message To My Girl (1983)

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Song of the day: Split Enz – "How Can I Resist Her"

February 26, 2012

Look, I’m terribly sorry about this but I’m still* in an enormous Split Enz phase, listening and re-listening to their entire back catalogue, as well as all the associated solo Finn music and spin-off bands (Crowded House, The Swingers, Schnell Fenster et al).

I’ll try very, very hard to make this the last Split Enz post for a long time. (Well that’s what I’m hoping for anyway. After all, this is an Australian power pop blog, not a Split Enz blog.)

As I was listening to True Colours again after a decade or so of not hearing it, I was struck by how one song in particular could quite easily pass for a decent power pop song – especially if you didn’t know it was from Split Enz:

Split Enz – “How Can I Resist Her” (1980)

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To me, that’s a mighty good power pop song from 1980 – regardless of who recorded it.

(*And it’s all because of this book.)


Song of the day: Split Enz – "What’s The Matter With You"

February 16, 2012

I’m still in my huge Split Enz phase* I’m afraid, so that means I’m a-gonna pester you with some more Enz-ness.

Here’s one of their rip-roaring, high-energy songs from the band’s 1980 skinny-tie album, True Colours (and I love it):

Split Enz – “What’s The Matter With You (1980)

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(*This post explains why.)


Song of the day: Split Enz – "Sugar And Spice"

February 11, 2012

I must apologise for the next paragraph. It does relate to today’s song, but it is long and you’re under no obligation to read it.

I don’t know why, but I’m currently in a huge music book reading phase. I’ve been buying music books left, right, and centre. I can’t get enough of ’em. It started when I received the Keith Richards autobiography, Life, for Christmas (thanks, family!). I didn’t enjoy it (thanks anyway*, family!), so I quickly moved on to something else. I pounced on Starman: David Bowie – The Definitive Biography, and enjoyed it. Next was the fascinating Perfecting Sound Forever: An Aural History of Recorded Music. Then Legendary Guitarists & Their Guitars (great photos). And then Hunter Davies’ hallowed Beatles biography (I hadn’t read that one since 1979 and lost my copy years ago so I bought the updated one – now it’s even more fabulous). I’m happy to say that those books more than made up for the sour taste that Life left. There are a few more books on the bookshelf I haven’t gotten around to reading yet, such as 1001 Songs You Must Hear Before You Die, Sid Vicious: Rock and Roll Star, and Touch Me, I’m Sick: The 52 Creepiest Love Songs You’ve Ever Heard (thanks for the donation, sis!), but I hope to get my eager eyes on to them soon. At the moment, though, I’m reading Together Alone, a biography of the Finn brothers (Tim and Neil), and I’m enjoying it a lot. It’s prompted me to revisit the discographies of the Finn brothers (solo and together) and Split Enz. I’m loving those Split Enz albums all over again, especially the early ones. Because of this Split Enz listening frenzy (sorry about that, Enz fans), most of their early songs are stuck in my head. And a fair amount of those are from the band’s third album, Dizrythmia. Of all the Split Enz albums, Dizrythmia may very well be my favourite. (It’s the one I return to most often.) This is one of its tracks:

Split Enz – “Sugar And Spice” (1977)

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I love Dizrythmia.

The next book I want to get my greedy eyeballs on is Highway to Hell: The Life and Death of Bon Scott, which means there’ll probably be an AC/DC song here before too long.

By the way, apart from that Hunter Davies biography of The Beatles my favourite music biography is Bright Lights Dark Shadows: The Real Story of ABBA by Carl Magnus Palm. It’s eye-opening.

(*I really wanted to read Life, so the family did a lovely thing handing it over at Christmas time.)